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North Korea is preparing to use a new GPS jammer

Admin Posted on 2020-08-27

The North Korean military recently completed final tests on a new "GPS jamming device" for use against South Korea and is preparing for use on the ground, Daily NK has learned.

The Bureau of Weapons Review, an organization of the Ministry of the People's Army, submitted a report to the North Korean military leadership stating that the new jamming device can be used on the ground, a North Korean source told the Daily NK on April 23.

The office is studying and examining the possibility of using all strategic and tactical weapons jointly developed by the country's research institutes and factories.

GPS jammer uses a frequency-emitting device to interfere with radio communications and can interfere with phones, text messages, Wi-Fi networks, and GPS systems.

anti-tracking gps blocker

The bureau's report said that after careful reviews of the device since early January, final testing of the device on April 11th confirmed that the device was "stable" enough to be used in the field.

The report also found that the device has more advanced and refined attack capabilities than previous devices.

The report's conclusions suggest that North Korea may engage in more aggressive signal-related activities towards South Korea than in the past.

In fact, North Korea's development of this new device appears to be aimed at attacking communications systems used by South Korea and between US and South Korean forces.

After the device is rated "stable," it is expected to be deployed across the military starting next month, according to the Daily NK source. In particular, North Korea could aim to deploy the device quickly in the military's electronic warfare department and in the Electronic Reconnaissance Bureau 121 (Cyber ​​Warfare Agency) of the Reconnaissance General Bureau (RGB), which is responsible for disrupting operations against South Korea.

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